Many different reasons can lead to your toenail falling off. And when the dreaded time does come and it falls off it can seem like your world is falling apart. However, it doesn’t have to be that way at all. That’s why today we’re going to look at some of the reasons that could have led you to where you are today and what your options are going forward.

First, let’s look at some of the most common reasons why your toenail might be starting to fall off. One of the biggest causes of toenail loss is through an infection, typically a fungal infection. Some of the early signs of an infection include the nail becoming a yellow colour and starting to streak. If at this stage you don’t treat the nail you may have missed the opportunity to prevent losing it.

Other reasons why you are losing your toenail can be through injury, although you’ll most likely know if this is the reason why. Finally if you fancy yourself as an avid runner or athlete you’ll find that your toenail is constantly banging against the roof of the inside of your trainer hundreds of thousands of times. Over time this can case the nail to weaken and erode,

Now we’ve covered the reasons that can lead to toenail loss. Now let’s put to rest your worries and concerns and look at what your next steps are. Firstly, if it hasn’t fallen off yet, don’t give into temptation and tear the nail off. If it seems that it’s hanging on by just a thread you can however pull it off carefully with a pair of clippers.

When the nail has fallen off you might have noticed it starting to bleed. However, don’t worry, this is natural. Gently apply pressure to the area of bleeding until it stops. Once that is done it’s important to clear the area where the nail once lay with soap and water. It is also heavily recommended to add an antibacterial ointment to prevent any infection. If you’re unsure on which ointments are suitable you can always message me for my opinion. One of my areas in expertise with being a footcare practitioner is the health of your nails.

One of the main reasons for not needing to worry is that you’re not going to be nail-less forever. After a period of roughly about six weeks you’ll have a nail starting to grow back. In these six weeks you’re going to want to constantly clean the nail bed. After all, you don’t’ want the new nail growing on top of an infection. For the full nail to grow back you’re looking at about a year and when it does you’re going to want to ensure it is looked after.

If you want to know more about best practices when it comes to looking after your feet and nails visit my website or give me a message for answers to any questions you might have.